Queen's University

Scott Berthelette

Pre-Doctoral Fellow, Department of History
CULTURE, HISTORY, RELIGION, HUMANITIES, INDIGENOUS STUDIES, POLITICS AND POLICY
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Autobiography

I am a PhD Candidate at the University of Saskatchewan, who researches the history of New France, the Métis, the Fur Trade, and French-Indigenous relations in North America. I am currently completing a Pre-Doctoral Fellowship for Indigenous Students at Queen's University within the Department of History. I am a member of the Manitoba Métis Federation, the federally recognized self-government of the Métis people of Manitoba. 

My Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC)-funded dissertation is titled Between Sovereignty and Statecraft: New France and the Contest for the Hudson Bay Watershed, 1663-1774, and examines how French-Canadian voyageurs and coureurs de bois were instrumental intermediaries between the French State and Indigenous peoples in the Hudson Bay Watershed. In 2016, I published an article titled Frères et Enfants du même Père’: The French Illusion of Empire West of the Great Lakes, 1731-1743 in the peer-reviewed history journal Early American Studies.

You can find me on Twitter @S_Berthelette.

 

 

Most Recent Project

Between Sovereignty and Statecraft: New France and the Contest for the Hudson Bay Watershed, 1663-1774

Throughout the 1730s and 1740s, French colonial officers, fur traders, and voyageurs from Montréal established a series of forts northwest of Lake Superior in present-day Northwestern Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Minnesota, and North Dakota. These postes de l'Ouest, or Western Posts, secured New France’s pick of prime northern furs, and challenged the Hudson’s Bay Company’s monopoly on the fur trade in the Hudson Bay Watershed. A diverse cast of French non-elites—voyageurs, soldiers, merchants, and coureurs de bois —accompanied their commanding colonial officers from the Compagnies Franches de la Marine to the Western Posts and played an integral role in forming alliances with Crees, Assiniboines, Dakotas, Anishinaabeg-Ojibwes, and other Indigenous peoples of the Hudson Bay Watershed.

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Other Projects

  • "Frères et Enfants du même Père" : The French Illusion of Empire West of the Great Lakes, 1731-1743

    Cover page for research project by Queen's Pre-doctoral Fellow Scott Berthelette, titled "Frères et Enfants du même Père" : The French Illusion of Empire West of the Great Lakes, 1731-1743In the eighteenth-century, France’s metropolitan authorities and colonial officials tasked the French western explorer Pierre de La Vérendrye to integrate the Indigenous peoples of the Petit Nord – Cree, Assiniboine, Monsoni, Anishinaabeg, and Dakota – into the network of French-mediated alliances emanating from the Great Lakes. The governor-general of New France, known as Onontio by the Natives, sought to ensure the symbolic subjugation of all Indigenous peoples of the Great Lakes and the Petit Nord. Unlike the Great Lakes, devastated by endemic warfare and virulent diseases, the Indigenous social formations of the Petit Nord and Northern Great Plains remained politically cohesive and autonomous in the eighteenth-century.

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