Queen's University

Dr. Samantha King

Professor, Cultural Studies Program, Department of Gender Studies, School of Kinesiology and Health Studies
BIOSCIENCE, CULTURAL STUDIES, FEMINISM, HEALTH, LIFE & PHYSICAL SCIENCES, MEDIA, POLITICS AND POLICY, SCIENCE, SEXUALITY AND GENDER, SOCIAL SCIENCES
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Autobiography

I am a Professor in the School of Kinesiology and Health Studies and Head of the Department of Gender Studies, at Queen's University. Trained in cultural studies and sociology, I am an interdisciplinary scholar of the body, health and sport. I work with feminist, queer, and critical race theories to research a broad variety of topics ranging from drugs to food. I have an MA from Queen's, a PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champlaign, and BSocSci from the University of Birmingham.

I have authored several articles, chapters and publications, including my first book, Pink Ribbons, Inc: Breast Cancer and the Politics of Philanthropy, which challenges the commercialization of the breast cancer movement, and is the subject of an NFB documentary by the same name.  

Most Recent Project

Pink Ribbons, Inc. Breast Cancer and the Politics of Philanthropy

Book cover which depicts a photo of a jewel-encrusted pink ribbon, to represent the commercialization of the breast cancer movementPink Ribbons, Inc. challenges the commercialization of the breast cancer movement, its place in U.S. culture, and its influence on ideas of good citizenship, responsible consumption, and generosity. In this book, I trace how breast cancer has been transformed from a stigmatized disease and individual tragedy to a market-driven industry of survivorship.

In this book, I trace how breast cancer has been transformed from a stigmatized disease and individual tragedy to a market-driven industry of survivorship. In an unprecedented outpouring of philanthropy, corporations turn their formidable promotion machines on the curing of the disease while dwarfing public health prevention efforts, and stifling the calls for investigation into why and how breast cancer affects such a vast number of people. Here, for the first time, I question the effectiveness and legitimacy of privately funded efforts to stop the epidemic among American women.

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Other Projects

  • Between the Medicine Cabinet and the Street: Prescription Opioids in Canadian Culture

    Packets of pills, in reference to "Prescription Opioids in Canadian Culture", a study by Queen's University researcher Dr. Samantha King, in partnership with the CIHRThis project represents the second phase in a two-part Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) funded research program on prescription opioids, as sites of political contestation. The first phase, which concluded 2013, employed interview, policy and media analysis to trace how painkiller use came to be understood as a major social problem and how conflicting evidence about this concern is produced, negotiated, and resisted by key stakeholders. The second phase has three main objectives: 1) To explore how moral discourses helped shape the high profile policy shift around oxycodone; 2) To examine the health and social consequences of the new regulations for prescription painkiller users, service providers, and clinicians in Ontario; 3) To theorize the meanings of OxyContin/OxyNeo in the contemporary historical moment.

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