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The Conversation: Canada left behind as ride-hailing services go global

By Betsy Donald, Professor, Geography and Planning, and Shauna Brail, Associate Professor, Urban Studies Program, University of Toronto.
This article is republished from The Conversation.

Ride-hailing services have gone global, and even women in Saudi Arabia – only recently given the right to drive – are getting in on the action. In this June 2018 photo, a female driver for Careem, a regional ride-hailing Uber competitor, is seen behind the wheel. AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty
Ride-hailing services have gone global, and even women in Saudi Arabia – only recently given the right to drive – are getting in on the action. In this June 2018 photo, a female driver for Careem, a regional ride-hailing Uber competitor, is seen behind the wheel. AP Photo/Nariman El-Mofty

Like it or not, ride-hailing has become an established, regulated and accepted form of transportation in most of Canada’s largest cities.

Canadian cities aren’t unique in this regard. Ride-hailing is now a mobility option in 89 countries, serving more than 2,600 cities around the world.

By adopting a global outlook, Canada can better understand, manage and benefit from the integration of ride-hailing as a component of urban mobility.


To read the rest of the article, please visit The Conversation.